Do drugs, alcohol make us more creative? Study answers the age-old question

Do drugs, alcohol make us more creative? Study answers the age-old question

Time and time again, artists have claimed that drugs and alcohol allegedly helped their creative juices flow.

Renowned painter Pablo Picasso once called the smell of opium smoke "the most intelligent smell in the world"; rap artist Snoop Dogg is well known for his love for weed or marijuana and referring to his favourite vice has even been quoted as saying "the more medicated, the more dedicated"; Harry Styles' latest album 'Fine Line' was made under the influence of mushrooms that supposedly helped him be "fun and creative." Artists and their love for various drugs and alcohol is legendary. These legends have long been blamed for promoting psychedelics and intoxicants among the "easily influenced" younger generations. However, time and time again, artists have claimed that drugs and alcohol allegedly helped their creative juices flow. A new study has revealed the truth behind this and says the claim might just be a myth.

Do drugs, alcohol make us more creative? Study answers the age-old question
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Researchers from England's Essex University and Berlin’s Humboldt University have reached this conclusion after examining hundreds of papers on intoxicants and their effects. 

The researchers concluded that the alleged help these drugs provide to aid the creative processes is likely to be a myth and that to inspire creativity, travel, exposure to culture, meditation and good old hard work or training are more effective.

Jennifer Haase of the Humboldt University, a co-author of the paper as per Guardian, said that "ideas generated under the influence often seem disjointed or ill-suited as solutions later on."

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