Banknotes featuring Queen Elizabeth's picture remain legal tender: Bank of England

Banknotes featuring Queen Elizabeth's picture remain legal tender: Bank of England

According to Buckingham Palace, Charles and Camilla, the Queen Consort, will stay at Balmoral Castle until Friday, when they will fly back to London.

Following the monarch's passing on Thursday, the Bank of England declared that its banknotes bearing the picture of Queen Elizabeth were still valid legal tender.

"Current banknotes featuring the image of Her Majesty The Queen will continue to be legal tender. A further announcement regarding existing Bank of England banknotes will be made once the period of mourning has been observed "announced the central bank.

The first monarch to appear on Bank of England banknotes was Queen Elizabeth.

"It was with profound sadness that I learned of the death of Her Majesty The Queen. On behalf of everyone at the Bank I would like to pass on my deepest condolences to the Royal Family "Andrew Bailey, the governor, remarked.

Queen Elizabeth passed away peacefully at her residence in Scotland on Thursday at the age of 96. She was the longest-reigning monarch in British history, the head of the country, and a towering presence on the international scene for seven decades.

According to Buckingham Palace, Charles and Camilla, the Queen Consort, will stay at Balmoral Castle until Friday, when they will fly back to London.

Banknotes featuring Queen Elizabeth's picture remain legal tender: Bank of England
Queen Elizabeth II leaves behind a legacy of grace, dignity and dedication

Charles automatically ascends to the throne of the United Kingdom and 14 other nations, including Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, on Elizabeth's death. Our official name would be Charles III, according to his office.

When the queen's doctors announced that she was under medical observation just after midday on Thursday, her relatives hurried to be by her side as word spread that her condition was deteriorating.

Since the end of last year, the queen had been experiencing what Buckingham Palace described as "episodic mobility problems," which had forced her to cancel almost all of her public appearances.

Tuesday marked her last official act before leaving office when she named Liz Truss as her fifteenth prime minister.

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