Are Covid vaccines adversely affecting menstrual cycles? Here's the truth

Are Covid vaccines adversely affecting menstrual cycles? Here's the truth

Several doctors around the globe have called for detailed research on the connection between Covid vaccines and menstrual cycles.

Common side effects of coronavirus vaccines till now have been sore arm, light fever, fatigue and in some cases nausea. However, a study has now revealed that vaccines can also bring changes in menstrual cycle.

Experts working in reproductive health have reported that several of their patients have experienced changes in their periods and have also experienced sudden vaginal bleeding.

Women have experienced sudden change in length of their menstrual cycles. Some also had heavier bleeding immediately after their vaccines.

It is not just the vaccines; some women have also reported changes in their menstrual cycle immediately after getting infected by coronavirus and also in cases of Long Covid.

However, some experts are still not very sure about a connection between the coronavirus vaccines and changes in menstrual cycle. Media experts believe it may be due to weakening of the immune system at the time of vaccination of infection, that leads to painful and delayed menstrual cycles.

Such claims can also increase already-existing vaccine hesitancy among women, expert claim. Several doctors around the globe have called for detailed research on the connection between Covid vaccines and menstrual cycles.

Are Covid vaccines adversely affecting menstrual cycles? Here's the truth
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"Vaccine hesitancy among young women is largely driven by false claims that Covid-19 vaccines could harm their chances of future pregnancy," Dr Victoria Male, a researcher from the Imperial College, London said in an opinion piece. "Failing to thoroughly investigate reports of menstrual changes after vaccination is likely to fuel these fears. If a link between vaccination and menstrual changes is confirmed, this information will allow people to plan for potentially altered cycles."

With this new claim, experts have also reiterated that Covid vaccines do not hinder in fertility or chances of pregnancy, contrary to what some people have believed in the past.

Experts are urging women to get vaccinated against coronavirus as soon as possible, and abandon fears of infertility.

"There is no evidence to suggest that these temporary changes will have any impact on a person's future fertility, or their ability to have children," Dr Jo Mountfield, vice-president of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG), said.

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