Covid is here to stay and it affects women worse than men, says study

Covid is here to stay and it affects women worse than men, says study

The study says that for patients with long COVID, there are no effective pharmacological or non-pharmacological therapies.

More than 500 million instances of SARS-CoV-2 infection have been documented worldwide as of April 2022. Do you remember the initial days of the pandemic? The panic, the deaths, the loss? Even after battling COVID-19 for more than two years, we are yet to be rid of it.

As per a new study, the coronavirus may be here to stay and like so many other things that are just a little bit more problematic for women, this virus seems to affect the fairer gender worse.

The study says that for patients with long COVID, there are no effective pharmacological or non-pharmacological therapies.

Even after a year of infection and subsequent hospitalisation, not even one in four people can report a full recovery. This indicates that the virus is here to stay and it is on its way to becoming a common condition.

"Without effective treatments, long Covid could become a highly prevalent new long-term condition," said Christopher Brightling of the University of Leicester, one of the study's co-leads.

The study of over 2,300 persons also discovered that women were 33 per cent less likely than men to fully recover.

The research looked at the health of 807 persons who were discharged with Covid from 39 British hospitals between March 2020 and April 2021 and then assessed their recovery five months and one year later.

According to the study published in the Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal, only 26 per cent of patients reported complete recovery after five months, and that figure rose only marginally to 28.9 per cent after a year.

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"The limited recovery from five months to one year after hospitalisation in our study across symptoms, mental health, exercise capacity, organ impairment and quality-of-life is striking," said Rachel Evans of the National Institute for Health and Care Research, study co-leader.

Fatigue, muscle ache, poor sleep, physical slowdown, and breathlessness were the most prevalent long-Covid effects.

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