Moderna asks FDA to authorise its COVID vaccine for children younger than 6

Moderna asks FDA to authorise its COVID vaccine for children younger than 6

Moderna claims that its vaccination efficacy against infection was 51 percent in infants under the age of two

Moderna has formally submitted a request to the Food and Drug Administration for approval of two doses of its COVID-19 vaccine in children fewer than six years old, beginning a long-awaited government review process that might soon see the first vaccines for these youngest Americans approved.

Moderna's request is based on data released in March that showed two 25-microgram doses of their vaccine were effective in this age range. These are lower amounts than the two 100-microgram doses given to adults.

In a statement, Stéphane Bancel, Moderna's CEO, said the vaccine will be able to safely protect these children against SARS-CoV-2, which is so important in our continued fight against COVID-19, and will be especially welcomed by parents and caregivers.

According to the business, they found a "strong neutralising antibody response" and a "favourable safety profile" in two groups of children: 6 months to 23 months old and 2 years old to under 6 years old.

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Moderna claims that its vaccination efficacy against infection was 51 percent in infants under the age of two and 37 percent in children aged two to five years old, according to a preliminary study of lab tests collected during the Omicron wave.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and several independent infectious disease specialists, more parents should vaccinate and boost their children's immune systems.

Even while the omicron surge has subsided and children are less likely to become really ill, the virus can still be dangerous.

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