Stop using cruel methods to kill male chicks: Goa govt

Stop using cruel methods to kill male chicks: Goa govt

PETA in its petition to the Goa government department had said that the egg industry “commonly kills male chicks because they can’t lay eggs

Following petitioning by PETA, the Goa government’s Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Services (AHVS) department has warned hatcheries and poultry farms from using “cruel methods” to kill newborn male chicks.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals on Thursday welcomed the directive issued by the Director AHVS Santosh Desai.

“It is brought to the notice of all hatcheries and poultry farms operating in the state of Goa to stop the cruel methods used for killing newborn male chicks and other unwanted chicks in the hatcheries,” the circular issued by Desai said.

“Methods recommended by the Animal Welfare Board of India and the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals rules 2019, which prescribes the use of nitrogen and other inert gases for killing newborn chicks should henceforth be adopted,” it also added.

Stop using cruel methods to kill male chicks: Goa govt
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PETA in its petition to the Goa government department had said that the egg industry “commonly kills male chicks because they can’t lay eggs, while both the meat and egg industries routinely destroy other unwanted chicks, including those who are weak or deformed”.

“Common killing methods include grinding, crushing, burning, or drowning them and even feeding them alive to fish,” the animal rights’ organisation said in a statement issued here on Thursday.

“Through the order, the state government also made a pioneering policy decision that once in ovo sex-determination technology – which identifies male embryos at an early stage of development so that an egg, rather than a live bird, can be destroyed – is commercially available in India, the state will adopt the technology,” the statement also said.

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