WATCH: A farmer in India moves his $188,000 house to make way for an expressway

WATCH: A farmer in India moves his $188,000 house to make way for an expressway

Up until the reports came in last, Sukhwinder's house had been moved 250 feet already. The target spot is 500 feet away.

What do you do when a house you've built with utmost love and hard work lies in the middle of a government infrastructure project? Accept the order and the compensation and move away? For most, it might be the rational approach but for a farmer in the Indian state of Punjab, taking the compensation and allowing authorities to demolish his home was not the way out.

Reportedly, Sukhwinder Singh Sukhi, a farmer, living in the Roshanwla village of Sangrur district in Punjab had built a $188,000 two-storey home on his field.

However, soon it was revealed that his house, which took two years in the making lay in the middle of the Delhi-Amritsar-Katra expressway construction. The state government informed Sukhwinder about the situation and offered him a compensation to move away and let authorities demolish the house.

However, Sukhwinder refused to take the compensation, stating it would be too expensive to build another home. Thus, the farmer took matters in his own hands and employed a construction crew that has experience in moving homes.

Up until the reports came in last, Sukhwinder's house had been moved 250 feet already. The target spot is 500 feet away.

"I'm shifting the house as it was coming in the way of the Delhi-Amritsar-Katra Expressway. I was offered compensation but didn't want to build another house. I have spent around Rs 1.5 crore ($188,000) to build it. Right now it's been moved by 250 feet," Sukhwinder was quoted as saying by ANI.

WATCH: A farmer in India moves his $188,000 house to make way for an expressway
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It is pertinent to note that after the house is relocated, all Sukhwinder will need to do is relay the floor which has been removed to insert the hydraulic jacks and planks.

Relocating buildings is not a new process. It has been around since the 1700s. Back then, horse-drawn carriages and wooden planks were used to move the houses. However, nowadays, sophisticated machinery is used to remove such structures.

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