Explained: Does writing on Indian rupee make it invalid? Here's a fact check

Explained: Does writing on Indian rupee make it invalid? Here's a fact check

The Clean Note Policy was announced in 1999 by India's central bank- the Reserve Bank of India (RBI).

Often we come across notes of the Indian rupee- Rs 10, 20, 100, 500 and 2,000 with hand-written messages, doodles or some kind of a symbol. Many of us would remember the ''Sonam Gupta bewafa hai'' on a Rs 10 note which became a viral meme in the country. Recently an image started circulating that writing anything on rupee notes makes them invalid and they will no longer be legal tender. 

However, this claim was fake and the central government of India issued a clarification last Sunday (January 8). 

What was the fake claim?

Taking to Twitter, the government's Press Information Bureau's (PIB) Fact Check wing shared an image of the fake claim which said, "As per new guidelines of the Reserve Bank of India (RBI), writing anything on new notes makes the note invalid and it will no more be a legal tender," the claim read. 

Government's clarification

The PIB Fact Check tweeted last Sunday that the claim is fake. "NO, Bank notes with scribbling are not invalid & continue to be legal tender," PIB Fact Check said. However, it pointed out that as per the Clean Note Policy, people are requested not to write on the currency notes as it defaces them & reduces their life. 

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What is the Clean Note Policy?

The Clean Note Policy was announced in 1999 by India's central bank- the Reserve Bank of India (RBI). In a statement, the RBI says that the objective of the Clean Note Policy is to give the citizens good quality currency notes and coins while the soiled notes are withdrawn out of circulation. Ever since the policy was announced, several steps were taken for augmenting the supply of currency notes and coins.

According to the RBI, people have been urged not to write on the currency notes and banks are instructed to provide unrestricted facilities for the exchange of soiled and mutilated notes. "As per the Reserve Bank instructions, currency chest branches of the banks must offer, even to non-customers, good quality notes and coins in exchange for soiled and mutilated notes," the central bank's statement adds. 

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