'Strongly bonded' male baboons hold each other back when it comes to finding a mate, study tells

'Strongly bonded' male baboons hold each other back when it comes to finding a mate, study tells

Scientists have highlighted the benefits of male friendships in wild Guinea baboons in Senegal.

Scientists have analysed the social investment in male friendships and male reproductive success in the wild Guinea baboons. They attempted to find out when and why male buddies become less important than female mating partners. The findings of the research were published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. The study highlights close friendships among males, which are so uncommon. Usually, what happened, males compete for rank and access to attract females. Scientists from the German Primate Center (DPZ) investigated the benefits of male friendships in wild Guinea baboons in Senegal. As per the study, Guinea baboons are known for strong bonds among males.

To carry out the study, data from 30 males and 50 infants were collected over four years in the Niokolo-Koba National Park, Senegal.

Meanwhile, scientists have highlighted the benefits of male friendships in wild Guinea baboons in Senegal. In India, friends can provide support in climbing the rank ladder or defending females from other males.

Male friendships can also be beneficial for male reproduction, as friends can provide support in climbing the rank ladder or defending females from other males.

'Strongly bonded' male baboons hold each other back when it comes to finding a mate, study tells
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"Males may gain access to females via overt competition, or by forming friendships with other males that help them to rise in status and increase reproductive success," said Dr Federica Dal Pesco, from the German Primate Center.

"But what are the predictors of reproductive success in a society with no discernible male rank relations and female choice, as in Guinea baboons? We found a clear negative relationship between male-male sociality and number of females and sired offspring," Dr Federica Dal Pesco said.

"Guinea baboon males seem to face a trade-off between investments in same-sex versus opposite-sex bonds. Egalitarian societies with female choice promote male strategies that favour the investment in male-female bonding over male competition," Dr Dal Pesco added.

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