Mysterious jellyfish found off the coast of Papua New Guinea intrigues researchers

Mysterious jellyfish found off the coast of Papua New Guinea intrigues researchers

The doctor admitted that she had a hard time holding back her excitement when she first viewed the jellyfish

Dorian Borcherds, a diver in Ireland, recently captured a video of a strange-looking jellyfish off the coast of Papua New Guinea. The diver saw three or four of the jellyfish, amazed by their precise design and the way they appeared to move firmly in the water. With hundreds of questions, he forwarded the video to his wife in South Africa, Dr. Lisa-ann Gershwin, a jellyfish expert at Australian Marine Stinger Advisory Services, posted the video on the Jellyfish app to find a solution. The doctor admitted that she had a hard time holding back her excitement when she first viewed the jellyfish, Fontoura news reported.

Gershwin now believes the magnificent organism is a new species, as opposed to her initial assumption that the footage was the second sighting of the mysterious jellyfish known as Chirodectes maculatus, as per a theory that was discovered decades ago on the Great Barrier Reef. She’s sure of her conclusions, but her research for the species classification hasn’t been reviewed yet.

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Another jellyfish specialist, Prof. Kylie Pitt, a marine ecologist, suggested that it might be a new species, but she doesn’t believe it would be feasible to determine on the basis of a video. However, she accepted that she hasn’t seen anything like it before.

While on the other hand, as per Gershwin, she claimed that it was Chirodectes maculatus that was sighted once in 1997 in north Queensland. She and Peter Davie, a retired but still active curator from the Queensland Museum, assisted her. Both carefully examined the video and noted that the jellyfish was larger than what could fit in our hands, roughly the size of a soccer ball and other technical differences. In the end, they both concluded that it was some new species, most likely to belong to the same genus as spotted in 1997.

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