Dogs get more teary-eyed after being reunited with their owners: Study

Dogs get more teary-eyed after being reunited with their owners: Study

The team of scientists used a test called the Schirmer Tear Test to gauge its hypothesis on 20 dogs

Dogs are an instant source of serotonin and oxytocin for many. The way they jump across the room and rush to their owners, wagging their cute little tails is something that seals an eternal bond between humans and their most faithful pet. Now, a study has revealed that during this reuniting moment, dogs tend to get more teary-eyed than usual.

Reportedly, the study published by Japanese scientists in the journal Current Biology states that dogs tear up with joy and happiness whenever they are reunited with their owners after a prolonged period of absence.

"We found that dogs shed tears associated with positive emotions. We also made the discovery of oxytocin as a possible mechanism underlying it," said one of the authors related to the study.

The team of scientists used a test called the Schirmer Tear Test to gauge its hypothesis on 20 dogs. In the test, a paper strip is placed inside the eyelid of the furry pets for a minute before and after they were reunited with their owners.

To make the results more comprehensive and true, the scientists used a normal meeting of the dog and its owner as the baseline. Afterwards, both readings were compared, allowing the scientists to make an informed inference.

Dogs get more teary-eyed after being reunited with their owners: Study
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The study clearly showed that the dogs produced more tears within the first five minutes of the reunification. Reportedly, the baseline readings were around the 22mm mark, which increased by 10 per cent after the meeting.

According to the researchers, they even compared the data when the dogs were reunited with someone they were familiar with. However, the tears only increased when reunited with the owner.

Takefumi Kikusui, co-author of the study and a professor at the Laboratory of Human-Animal Interaction first got the idea of conducting such research when he saw his poodle swell up with tears while tending to her.

"That gave me the idea that oxytocin could increase the tears,” remarked Kikusui.

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