93-million-year-old crocodile found with the remains of a dinosaur in its stomach

93-million-year-old crocodile found with the remains of a dinosaur in its stomach

The eight-foot-long, previously undiscovered species of crocodile is now dubbed as Confractosuchus Sauroktonos by researchers.

A group of Paleontologists has made an astonishing discovery. They found a 95-million-year-old crocodile skeleton in Queensland, Australia. It is a previously unknown species of crocodile. But that was not all, the crocodile seemed to have a rather full and unexpected meal before its death. Because in his stomach, the paleontologists also found the remains of a dinosaur a little bigger than a chicken. If you want a better picture of the dinosaur, think Ducky from animated film Land Before Time.

93-million-year-old crocodile found with the remains of a dinosaur in its stomach
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The research was led by Matt White, an associate at the Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum. All That’s Interesting reported that the team of paleontologists and volunteers made the discovery at a geological rock formation called the Winton Formation. They had found dinosaur bones before at this place. While they were actually looking for sauropod bones, the team ended up finding the crocodile remains when a front loader started scraping excess dirt from the site.

The eight-foot-long, previously undiscovered species of crocodile is now dubbed as Confractosuchus Sauroktonos by researchers. The name means – broken dinosaur killer.

Talking about the X-rays, CT scans, and 3D computer modeling, they are used for studying the intertwined bones, White said, “The technology that we’re using is drawing new life into what we can see within these fossils. It’s going to change how things are done.”

While the crocodile seemed to have enjoyed a full meal, the tiny dinosaur was not that lucky. The small, herbivorous dinosaur was the Ornithopod that lived 100 million years ago. Looking at the fossils, the researchers concluded that the crocodile “sheared” one of the Ornithopod’s femurs in half. While its other femur had the scar of a tooth mark. They explained that while the crocodile species might not have specialized in eating dinosaurs, the young dinosaur was too easy a meal to simply overlook.

Picture Ducky from Land Before Time at the side of a river bank. Unaware of what was going to unfold. Out comes a croc and grabs the innocent Ducky. That’s the picture the White had painted. But judging from its missing tail, it seems the croc did not survive long either. While the researchers are not sure of the cause of its death, it is entirely possible that after making a meal out of the Ornithopod, some creature higher up on the food chain made a meal out of the croc. Or at least of its tail.

The fossils of this newly discovered crocodile are displayed at the Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum now.

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