Bird flies from Alaska to Australia non-stop, surpasses Guinness world record

Bird flies from Alaska to Australia non-stop, surpasses Guinness world record

The bird is believed to have lost “half or more of its body weight during continuous day and night flight”

A bar-tailed godwit broke a Guinness World Record when it flew 13,560 kilometres from Alaska to Tasmania, Australia, non-stop.

The Limosa lapponica, which goes by its tag number “234684,” covered the distance without any food or rest, according to the Guinness world record.

“The distance covered is equivalent to two and a half trips between London and New York, or approximately one-third of the planet’s full circumference. According to the 5G satellite tag attached to its lower back, the epic journey started on October 13, 2022, and continued for 11 days and one hour without the bird landing once,” Guinness said, ALCWweb reported.

The long-distance migrations of bar-tailed godwits have made headlines before as well. This year's 5-month-old Godwit surpassed the previous record of over 350 kilometres, which was set by a different bird of the same species in 2020.

The bird is believed to have lost “half or more of its body weight during continuous day and night flight,” Birdlife Tasmania's Eric Woehler told Guinness World Records.

“Short-tailed shearwaters and mutton birds can land on the water and feed. If a Godwit land on water, it’s dead. It doesn’t have the webbing on its feet, it has no way of getting off. So if it falls onto the ocean’s surface from exhaustion, or if bad weather forces it to land, that’s the end,” he continued.

Bird flies from Alaska to Australia non-stop, surpasses Guinness world record
BNHS to tag 2,000 birds to study migratory route

According to experts, these birds usually migrate to New Zealand. But, this Godwit made a 90-degree turn and landed on the sands of Ansons Bay in eastern Tasmania, Australia.

Long-distance avian travellers are not limited to bar-tailed godwits. Over the course of a year, Arctic terns (Sterna paradisaea) can routinely travel even further distances.

Related Stories

No stories found.
logo
Indians In Gulf
www.indiansingulf.in