Harappan city Dholavira in Gujarat gets UNESCO World Heritage Site tag

Harappan city Dholavira in Gujarat gets UNESCO World Heritage Site tag

With the addition of two new sites, India’s number of World Heritage sites has increased to 40.

Harappan city Dholavira, located in present-day Gujarat, has been inscribed in UNESCO's world heritage sites, confirmed the UN's cultural body on Tuesday.

Taking to its official Twitter handle, UNESCO tweeted, "BREAKING! Dholavira: A Harappan City, in #IndiaFlag of India, just inscribed on the @UNESCO #WorldHeritage List. Congratulations!"

During the 44th session of the UNESCO World Heritage Committee in Fuzhou, China, it was decided to inscribe Kakatiya Rudreshwara (Ramappa) Temple, Telangana and Dholavira: A Harrapan City, Gujarat on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

With the addition of two new sites, India’s number of World Heritage sites has increased to 40.

Reacting to it, Union Tourism Minister G Kishan Reddy said, "Another feather in India’s cap as we now enter Super-40 club for World Heritage Site inscription. Since 2014, India has added 10 new World Heritage sites."

Meanwhile, Prime Minister Narendra Modi also expressed his delight saying, "Absolutely delighted by this news. Dholavira was an important urban centre and is one of our most important linkages with our past. It is a must visit, especially for those interested in history, culture and archaeology."

"As CM of Gujarat, I had the opportunity to work on aspects relating to heritage conservation and restoration in Dholavira. Our team also worked to create tourism-friendly infrastructure there," he added.

Harappan city Dholavira in Gujarat gets UNESCO World Heritage Site tag
5 sites in Saudi Arabia & Europe added to UNESCO's World Heritage List

According to UNESCO, the ancient city of Dholavira is one of the most remarkable and well-preserved urban settlements in South Asia dating from the 3rd to mid-2nd millennium BCE (Before Common Era).

It is said to be one of the five largest Harappan sites and most prominent archeological sites in India belonging to the Indus Valley Civilisation.

Discovered in 1968, the site is set apart by its unique characteristics, such as its water management system, multi-layered defensive mechanisms, extensive use of stone in construction and special burial structures.

Of note is also the art associated with the city – artefacts of various kinds such as copper, shell, stone, jewellery of semi-precious stones, terracotta, gold, ivory have been found at the site.

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