Do you often pick your nose? This researcher's explanation might swear you off the habit for good

Do you often pick your nose? This researcher's explanation might swear you off the habit for good

Who doesn't pick their nose once in a while? Even if it doesn't become a habit, it's a bodily act that happens subconsciously to millions of people.

Nose-picking is generally seen as unpleasant but harmless. But now, a university professor has sent alarm bells ringing by explaining the potential dangers that are linked to the habit.

Who doesn't pick their nose once in a while? Even if it doesn't become a habit, it's a bodily act that happens subconsciously to millions of people.

But if you have turned nose-picking into a habit over the years, you might want to work on ending it because it can lead to a neurological condition in later life.

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Professor St John, the head of the Clem Jones Centre for Neurobiology and Stem Cell Research at Griffith University in Queensland explained that nose-picking has some frightening risks associated with it.

He pointed out the potential and unknown dangers of the habit in a TikTok video.

He said that damage to the lining of the nose can increase the chances of bacteria going up to the brain.

"Picking your nose or plucking the hairs from your nose is probably not a good idea, particularly if you don't want to get Alzheimer's disease. If you damage the lining of the nose, you can increase how many bacteria can go up into your brain.

To substantiate his explanation, he referenced a paper the university had published not too long ago.

The research found that bacteria that enter the brain as a result of a damaged lining can contribute to developing Alzheimer's disease.

The bacterium 'Chlamydia pneumoniae' can enter the brain via the nerves of the nasal cavity, Associate Professor Jenny Ekberg and colleagues from the Clem Jones Centre for Neurobiology and Stem Cell Research at Menzies Health Institute Queensland and Griffith Institute for Drug Discovery found.

The study went on to show that the bacteria can eventually reach the central nervous system to trigger a reaction of the cells of the brain to deposit beta amyloid peptide.

“These cells are usually important defenders against bacteria, but in this case, they become infected and can help the bacteria to spread," said Associate Professor Ekberg.

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