Indian researchers witness merger of three supermassive black holes

Indian researchers witness merger of three supermassive black holes

Indian researchers have now witnessed a merger of three supermassive black holes.

Black holes are mysterious. No one perfectly knows what is their true nature. No one knows what lies on the other side. Are they pathways to different universe or do they facilitate time-travel? Nobody knows. Venture too close to a black hole and you will be sucked in forever. They have such unimaginable pull that even light does not escape.

Then there are supermassive black holes that are millions of times bigger. They literally hold entire galaxies together and are usually located at the centre of a galaxy. Just like Milky Way.

Indian researchers have now witnessed a merger of three supermassive black holes. This merger has caused formation of triple active galactic nucleus.

Ministry of Science and Technology made an announcement about this.

"...A team of researchers from the Indian Institute of Astrophysics consisting of Jyoti Yadav, Mousumi Das, and Sudhanshu Barway along with Francoise Combes of College de France, Chaire Galaxies et Cosmologie, Paris, while studying a known interacting galaxy pair, NGC7733, and NGC7734, detected unusual emissions from the centre of NGC7734 and a large, bright clump along the northern arm of NGC7733. Their investigations showed that the clump is moving with a different velocity compared to the galaxy NGC7733 itself. The scientists meant that this clump was not a part of NGC7733; rather, it was a small separate galaxy behind the arm. They named this galaxy NGC7733N...," says a press release from the ministry.

Indian researchers witness merger of three supermassive black holes
Black holes ‘burp’ after eating gas and stars

This study has been published as a letter in journal Astronomy and Astrphysics. This study was conducted using the data from the Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) onboard the first Indian space observatory ASTROSAT, the European integral field optical telescope called MUSE mounted on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile and infrared images from the optical telescope (IRSF) in South Africa.

Related Stories

No stories found.
Indians In Gulf
www.indiansingulf.in