First exoplanet to survive death of its star provides hint of solar system's future

First exoplanet to survive death of its star provides hint of solar system's future

Astronomers observed the exoplanet's transformation from a ''red giant'' to a ''giant branch'' star and published their findings in Nature.

The death of the first known exoplanet to survive the death of its star provides a glimpse of the solar system's future, as per a new study.

The death of the solar system has been a question regarding which there has been a lot of speculation.

Research has stated that the Sun will become a burnt remnant of a white dwarf and will eventually fade into darkness. Will planets suffer a similar fate?

More than 4,500 exoplanets revolve around the Sun. But a new Jupiter-like exoplanet discovered by the Keck Observatory has provided a crucial glimpse into the snapshot of planetory survivors.

Astronomers observed the exoplanet's transformation from a ''red giant'' to a ''giant branch'' star and published their findings in Nature.

First exoplanet to survive death of its star provides hint of solar system's future
New habitable exoplanets to accelerate search for life outside solar system

The exoplanet would have been engulfed in the star's expansion if it had been closer to its parent star.

The findings of the study confirm that asteroids break up when they come in close contact with the surface of the white dwarf.

Scientists have spotted a planet orbiting a star relatively near our solar system that may offer a prime opportunity to study the atmosphere of a rocky Earth-like alien world, the type of research that could aid the hunt for extraterrestrial life.

The researchers said the planet, called Gliese 486 b and classified as a ‘super-Earth,’ is not itself a promising candidate as a refuge for life. It is thought to be inhospitable - hot and dry like Venus, with possible rivers of lava flowing on its surface.

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