Longest known cave painting created by indigenous Americans found in US, says study

Longest known cave painting created by indigenous Americans found in US, says study

This 1,000-year-old image of a 10-foot-long (3 meters) rattlesnake has broken all records, media reports said.

A longest known painting, which was created by early indigenous Americans, have been discovered by archaeologists in Alabama, said a new study.

This 1,000-year-old image of a 10-foot-long (3 meters) rattlesnake has broken all records, media reports said.

This image and other paintings were crafted by indigenous Americans from mud on the walls and ceiling of a cave. It also depicts spirits of the underworld, the researchers said.

This cave has hundreds of such paintings. It is highly likely to be considered as the richest place for Native American cave art in American Southeast, the researchers said.

In the journal ‘Antiquity’, the study will be published on Wednesday (May 4).

The team used photogrammetry to investigate this art. This technique involves taking many images digitally to build a virtual 3D model. With the help of this method, the researchers spotted five earlier unknown giant cave paintings, which are known as glyphs.

"This methodology allows us to create a virtual model of the space that we can manipulate. In this particular case, the ceiling of the cave is very close to the floor. So, your field of vision is limited by your proximity to the ceiling. We never saw these very large images because we couldn't get back far enough to see them," study’s author Jan Simek, professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee, told Live Science.

After creating the virtual model, "we could look at it from a greater perspective. It allows us to see things in a way that we can't in person," Simek added.

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