'Cursed tomb' discovered at ancient site in Israel with 'Do not open' warning

'Cursed tomb' discovered at ancient site in Israel with 'Do not open' warning

The tomb had a warning written in red for the people trying to open it.

A tomb with a dire warning is not something new for horror movie fans. However, it turned out to be a reality in Israel as archaeologists found a tomb in an ancient cemetery with a warning written in blood red letters for anyone who tries to open it. The tomb was found in an ancient cemetery at the Beit She'arim. This was the first tomb found at the UNESCO World Heritage Site for 65 years. Excavations were happening at the site for almost a year, and this was the first major breakthrough for the archaeologists. The tomb had a warning written in red for the people trying to open it.

After translating the text, the researchers said that the warning read - “Yaakov Ha’Ger vows to curse anybody who would open this grave, so nobody will open it. 60 years old.”

While these warnings are mainly meant for grave robbers or people who try to disturb these places, the researchers said that it was most probably done to stop other people from reusing the tomb.

"It was to prevent others from opening the tomb at a later point, which happened quite often - re-using tombs through time," said Adi Erlich, one of the reserachers.

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"The inscription is from the late Roman or early Byzantine period, in which Christianity was strengthened. And here we find evidence that there are still people who choose to join the Jewish people. We know of converts in the Roman period mostly from funerary contexts, such as first-century AD Jerusalem, or third to fourth-century AD Rome. But this is the first proselyte from Beit She'arim, and they are not well attested from that time in Galilee. So, this is real news,”

"We just took care of the inscription and blocked the cave to keep it safe for the time being. No excavations are planned at the moment," she added according to a report on Times of Israel.

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