NASA's Artemis I mission to Moon: When and where to watch the historic launch

NASA's Artemis I mission to Moon: When and where to watch the historic launch

Artemis I will be on its maiden voyage on a mission to take humans back to the Moon, and eventually to Mars.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is all set to take the next, and very crucial step in space exploration with their uncrewed Artemis I mission to Moon, which will launch on Monday (August 29). This is NASA's first mission to the moon in 50 years.

Artemis I will be on its maiden voyage on a mission to take humans back to the Moon, and eventually to Mars.

The world will be watching the historic launch as all eyes will be on Launch Complex 39B when the Orion spacecraft and the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket will lift off from Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Hundreds and thousands of people will be watching the launch along the beaches of Florida, including United States Vice President Kamala Harris. Thousands of others will be streaming online to watch this launch that's been decades in the making.

Here's all you need to know about the historic launch of the Artemis I mission:

Date of Artemis I launch

Artemis I mission will be launched on Monday, August 29.

Time of Artemis I launch

Artemis I mission is scheduled to launch at 8:33am EDT (around 6:00pm IST)

How to live stream Artemis I launch

To get the latest and most accurate updates, viewers can watch the live feed of the mission from NASA. The space agency will provide live footage of the mission as and when it happens.

NASA's Artemis I mission to Moon: When and where to watch the historic launch
NASA all set to 'create history' with Artemis moon mission, precursor to first crewed Orion mission

Facts about Artemis I

-Mission duration: 42 days, 3 hours, 20 minutes

-Total distance travelled: 1.3 million miles

-Re-entry speed: 24,500 mph (Mach 32)

-Splashdown: Oct. 10, 2022

About Artemis I

As humanity looks beyond planet Earth for life, NASA's Artemis I will be the first in a series of increasingly complex missions to build a long-term human presence on the Moon in the coming decades.

NASA administrator Bill Nelson said Saturday, "This mission goes with a lot of hopes and dreams of a lot of people. And we now are the Artemis generation."

The main objective of the flight is to test the SLS and the Orion crew capsule that sits atop the rocket. Also to demonstrate Orion's systems in a spaceflight environment and ensure a safe re-entry, descent, splashdown and recovery before the first flight with crew on Artemis II.

The capsule will orbit the Moon to see if the vessel is safe for people in the near future.

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