Geomagnetic storm hits Earth, more to follow as Sun erupts with intense activity

Geomagnetic storm hits Earth, more to follow as Sun erupts with intense activity

The solar wind causing the geomagnetic storm is blowing at a staggering speed of 2,16,0000 kilometers per hour from a large hole in the Sun's atmosphere.

The sun continues to blare storms, high-speed particles, and coronal mass ejections as it reaches its peak activity in the current solar cycle. The star in our solar system hurtled a geomagnetic storm that hit Earth on Sunday and more are likely to follow in the coming days.

While the geomagnetic storm began on Saturday with a solar stream hitting Earth, minor G-1 class storms are underway, triggering auroras and radio blackouts in some places. Spaceweather.com, which tracks solar activity, reported that more auroras could be triggered at high-latitude areas of the planet.

Geomagnetic storms are a major disturbance of Earth's magnetosphere that occurs when there is a very efficient exchange of energy from the solar wind into the space environment surrounding Earth.

"A G-2 (Moderate) geomagnetic storm watch continues for the remainder of 04 Sep and has been extended into 05 September. A chance for a weak, glancing blow from the arrival of the 02 Sep CME is possible for midday 05 Sep as well," the space weather prediction center under the US-based Noaa said in an update.

Geomagnetic storm hits Earth, more to follow as Sun erupts with intense activity
Something exploded behind the Sun. Its intensity remains unknown

The solar wind causing the geomagnetic storm is blowing at a staggering speed of 2,16,0000 kilometers per hour from a large hole in the Sun's atmosphere. "The storm is lasting longer than expected, and geomagnetic activity could persist through September 5," spaceweather.com reported.

This is not the first time that geomagnetic storms and radio blackouts have hit Earth in September. Noaa reported multiple such blackouts last week when multiple M-class solar flares hit Earth. Solar flares are intense bursts of radiation from the Sun that can be seen as bright flashes of light.

The predictions of the geomagnetic storm come days after a canyon of fire opened up on the sun as a sunspot became unstable and erupted. The chasm was big enough to swallow Earth.

The Sun last week hurtled 32 coronal mass ejections, 24 solar flares, and two new active regions formed.

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