Doomsday clock may tick closer to midnight, as experts warn of nuclear war

Doomsday clock may tick closer to midnight, as experts warn of nuclear war

On Tuesday, the atomic scientists will make an announcement about the doomsday clock, whether its timing will change to 10:00 am (1500 GMT

The Doomsday Clock, which the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists had created as an indicator to understand how close the world has reached to the apocalypse, may reach closer to midnight in 2023, said an expert on the existential threat.

Centre for the Study of Existential Risk at the University of Cambridge's senior research associate Paul Ingram on Monday said that climate change and the threat of nuclear war will act as factors in pushing the arms of the clock towards the time which is symbolic to "doom".

Ingram, who doesn't belong to the group of scientists who will decide the clock's position, said that if a nuclear war breaks out in the world, billions of people will be killed because of its effects on the climate, as it would lead to starvation and disasters.

"It's not just a risk of the detonations, the blasts, the radiation, which everybody is aware of, but it's the global climatic effects that are likely to kill the most people from a nuclear war, probably in the billions," he stated.

Ingram said that however, said that there is still hope amid the concern of disaster looming upon the world.

"I think as the threats get larger and that we become more aware and we understand them better, there is hope. I think there is a growing awareness, I detect, that business as usual is just not an option,” Ingram said.

On Tuesday, the atomic scientists will make an announcement about the doomsday clock, whether its timing will change to 10:00 am (1500 GMT).

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The scientists who worked on developing the first atomic weapons of the United States founded the bulletin. The bulletin's Science and Security Board decides where to place the hands of the clock in consultation with its Board of Sponsors, in which Nobel laureates are also present.

In 1947, when scientists created the clock, its time was set at seven minutes to midnight.

In 2020, the clock's hands moved to 100 seconds and the timing remained the same in the 2021 announcement.

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