Five planets visible in skies. It's time to stargaze

Five planets visible in skies. It's time to stargaze

You will be able to see the closest planet to Earth (Venus) and the largest planet in the solar system (Jupiter) together once again in the skies.

Days after stargazers snapped Jupiter and Venus coming together in the evening sky, the two heavenly objects are set to be joined together by three others. Five planets will rise in the skies above Earth as they continue to move about in their orbits as seen from our point of view.

Mercury, Jupiter, Venus, Mars, and Uranus will march in unison in the skies above us as the Moon joins the party to form a rare celestial group. While the planets will all be seen in the skies tonight, they will not be aligned in a straight line across.

What makes this event even more interesting is that we will be able to see the closest planet to Earth (Venus) and the largest planet in the solar system (Jupiter) together once again in the skies. However, this time, they moved far away from each other as against their conjunction just about a month ago.

Yes, they will be visible across the country given clear skies and the amount of artificial light pollution. The Moon will be the brightest object in the skies, followed by Venus. Mars and Jupiter will appear dim given their positions in their current orbits and distance from Earth.

Jupiter, Venus, and Mars can be seen by the naked eye due to their higher brightness. However, you will require a telescope to pinpoint Uranus in the evening sky, which is 3.05 billion kilometers away from us. The planets have already begun appearing in the skies and stargazers across the world spotted them on Monday.

Just after sunset, the five planets will come together in rare alignment. The planets will line up from the horizon beginning with Jupiter, which could be seen around 7:30 pm in the evening sky, just after sunset. This will be followed by Venus, Uranus, Moon, and Mars going upwards.

According to astronomers, the planets will stretch from the horizon line to around halfway up the night sky. Mercury and Jupiter will quickly dip below the horizon around half an hour after sunset.

Five planets visible in skies. It's time to stargaze
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While the planets will appear lined up in the sky, it does not mean they are actually closer to each other. This kind of alignment happens when the planets’ orbits line them up on one side of the sun from Earth’s perspective, Cooke said.

While they will be most visible on Tuesday, they will continue to linger in skies above us till the end of the month, before disappearing in the vastness of the cosmos as Earth moves in its own orbit.

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