Aliens likely to communicate through newly discovered supernova, claim scientists

Aliens likely to communicate through newly discovered supernova, claim scientists

Astrophotographer Andrew McCarthy, who is famous for capturing beautiful shots of space, was among the first civilians to capture the epic event.

In the latest study, scientists have suggested that a newly discovered supernova, which is 21 million light-years from Earth, can turn into a beacon for aliens to communicate. The University of Washington's team of astronomers has set their sights on SN 2023ixf, which is placed in the Pinwheel galaxy. The supernova is the closest stellar explosion which has been seen by human eyes in a decade. 

The latest theory of the scientists has stemmed from the notion that at least 100 supernovas are 300 light years away from Earth and now they are investigating if inhabited planets are surrounding them.

If the supernova is observed by extraterrestrials, these alien civilisations are likely to use it as an attention grabber for communicating with other planets. 

Type II supernova discovered

The National Astronomical Observatory in Gozo detected SN 2023ixf which allowed researchers to figure out that it was a Type II supernova which had been a star as big as eight times the size of our sun. 

The team, headed by James Davenport, used the 'SETI ellipsoid' for carrying out this research of an egg-shaped space zone where alien civilisations are likely to have enough time to observe an astronomical event.

In this research, the zone has a chance to include 100 nearby stars. The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is being used by astronomers in North Carolina and Robert C Byrd Green Bank Telescope in Virginia to study the stars and understand if habitable planets surround them.

"We intend to revisit the Ellipsoid once a month for the next few months as new stars enter the sample, and are open to synchronizing our observations with other multiwavelength facilities," stated the study published in arXiv.

Speaking to New Scientist, Davenport accepted that there is less chance of him and his team making contact with aliens but believes it is worth a shot.

"The worst thing to happen would be for a signal to come in and us not to notice because we didn't bother to look," he stated. 

Astrophotographer captures supernova

Astrophotographer Andrew McCarthy, who is famous for capturing beautiful shots of space, was among the first civilians to capture the epic event.

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He uploaded an animation which included several images clicked of the Pinwheel Galaxy and showed a light blinking in the corner which was the explosion of the star.

"I used the colour data I already had on this galaxy and stacked about 10 minutes worth of exposures to create this animation," tweeted McCarthy. 

He added, "You can see how close the supernova is to some nebulae in the arm… imagine the view from there!" 

Speaking to Daily Mail, McCarthy said that for months he had been shooting the Pinwheel Galaxy and the star exploded while he was busy doing the same. 

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