Video: Mount Etna erupts for the second time in a month, spews lava and ash into the sky

Video: Mount Etna erupts for the second time in a month, spews lava and ash into the sky

It erupted earlier this month on February 3, following which Italian authorities issued an ash advisory.

Italy's Mount Etna erupted for the second time this month, spewing lava and ash into the sky and forcing a nearby airport to shut down temporarily.

The volcano, which is located in Sicily, spewed lava and sent huge clouds of ash drifting across its surrounding areas.

Local residents took videos and pictures as streams of red lava oozed down the mountain, which is nearly 11,000 feet tall. According to reports, the lava flow reached an altitude of more than 6,500 feet but didn't pose any threat to surrounding villages.

However, Catania airport had to be closed down temporarily as a precaution and emergency services were deployed to monitor the situation in the nearby villages.

The pictures and videos shared on the internet may paint an alarming picture but authorities have assured that the situation is very normal. Etna, which happens to be the most active volcano in Europe, has been erupting for centuries. But it has been particularly active in the past few decades.

It erupted earlier this month on February 3, following which Italian authorities issued an ash advisory.

Video: Mount Etna erupts for the second time in a month, spews lava and ash into the sky
Europe’s highest volcano Mount Etna, flames into life

The last major eruption of Mount Etna happened in 1971 when lave flow threatened several villages. At that time, several orchards and vineyards were reduced to ashes and the heat from the eruption had destroyed crops and plants. Since then, the eruptions were almost continuous.

Before this year, Etna's last major eruption was in the year 1999.

Despite all the threats, it continues to be a popular destination for tourists and hikers who are enthusiastic about seeing the lava flow at night.

While this volcano spewed lava, one of a different nature in Kazakhstan spewed ice recently.

Thousands of people are visiting Kazakhstan's Almaty region in harsh weather conditions to catch a glimpse of a 45-feet ‘ice volcano’ that has formed naturally.

The frozen structure is actually 45-feet in length and was formed over an underground spring that is spouting water that freezes almost instantly. The quick freezing builds upon the cone design of the 'ice volcano'.

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