'Unprecedented': Speed of global warming at its fastest pace since ice age

'Unprecedented': Speed of global warming at its fastest pace since ice age

The patch of resilient snow resides on Braeriach in Aviemore, Scotland's third highest mountain at 1,296 metres.

Global warming has always been a matter of concern for the entire globe. Amid the COP26 summit, a recent revelation by a new study states that the speed of human-caused global warming over the last 150 years is faster than anything since the last ice age as it is about 24,000 years ago. Published in the journal Nature, the study suggests that there is a general warming trend over the last 10,000 years.

"This reconstruction suggests that current temperatures are unprecedented in 24,000 years, and also suggests that the speed of human-caused global warming is faster than anything we've seen in that same time," said Jessica Tierney, an associate professor at the University of Arizona, and co-author of the study.

As a part of the study, the scientists created maps which highlighted global temperature changes for every 200 years interval going back 24,000 years. Lead study author Matthew Osman said, "The fact that we're today so far out of bounds of what we might consider normal is cause for alarm and should be surprising to everybody."

Two independent datasets were combined. This included temperature data from marine sediments and computer simulations of climate. To obtain information about past temperatures, the scientists looked at the chemical signatures of marine sediments.

"To forecast the weather, meteorologists start with a model that reflects current weather, then add in observations such as temperature, pressure, humidity, wind direction, and so on to create an updated forecast," Tierney said.

Currently, the team is working on using the method to know more about climate changes that happened in past.

The study further states that the main cause of climate change since the last ice age are the rising greenhouse gas concentrations and the retreat of the ice sheets.

Meanwhile, it has been reported that the UK's longest-lasting snow patch has melted away, for only the eighth time in 300 years. Nicknamed “the Sphinx”, the hardy piece of snow has survived countless summers on a remote mountainside in the Cairngorms.

The patch of resilient snow resides on Braeriach in Aviemore, Scotland's third highest mountain at 1,296 metres. After shrinking to the size of an A4 piece of paper in recent weeks, it finally disappeared in mild weather.

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