Here’s a list of Turkish desserts which will make you drool
Here’s a list of Turkish desserts which will make you drool

Beyond Baklava in Turkey

Desserts in Turkey is often a social ritual, a course meant to be shared. At any time of day or night, friends can be found hustled together to sip Turkish coffee or tea from dainty glasses. 

Ankara [Turkey] : If you are a foodie and travelling to Turkey then it is imperative that you try their traditional sweets. Baklava is just the tip of the iceberg and we list below some of the Turkish dishes which are to die for and guaranteed will make your trip unforgettable.

An indulgence for your sweet tooth.


Baklava - This is a rich, sweet pastry made of layers of filo, and filled with chopped nuts, this delicacy is sweetened and held together with syrup or honey. The sweet shops in Turkey are filled with varieties of Baklavas starting from chocolate to those nutty ones. This is one sweet that is best relished when eaten fresh. We do not try the ‘save it for later’ stand with this one sweet.

Thankfully  Baklava is one sweet that is  socially acceptable to be devoured for breakfast, fresh out of the oven.
Thankfully  Baklava is one sweet that is  socially acceptable to be devoured for breakfast, fresh out of the oven.

Lokma - Lokma is probably the lightest and simplest of the desserts on this list. The dish is made up of fried dough balls soaked in sugary syrup. This Mediterranean answer to a doughnut is crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside, coated with sugar syrup and melts in your mouth and you can easily eat 3-4 of them in one sitting, even more, if you feel like.

The dough is made from basic flour, yeast, salt, and oil before it's fried and doused with sugar syrup (and sometimes grated lemon peel).

Lokma means “bite” in Turkish, and these appropriately bite-sized pieces are rich and chewy, unlike our drier, more cakelike doughnut holes.
Lokma means “bite” in Turkish, and these appropriately bite-sized pieces are rich and chewy, unlike our drier, more cakelike doughnut holes.

Salep Ice Cream - This kind of ice cream is not sold anywhere else in the world. Its main ingredient - Salep - is protected by Turkey and is not exported. The main ingredient is made from the ground up orchids, making it very valuable as orchids take 7 or 8 years to grow. It is then turned into ice cream, and mixed with aromatic mastic (derived from an evergreen in the pistachio family) and whichever flavor (chocolate, strawberry, etc.) a customer desires.

The addition of salep results in a distinct elasticity, allowing the ice cream to droop off the side of the cone without melting and dripping.

Salep is a 3000 year old dessert  that was invented in a part of southeastern Turkey where all three key ingredients were plentiful—milk, mastic resin, and salep.
Salep is a 3000 year old dessert  that was invented in a part of southeastern Turkey where all three key ingredients were plentiful—milk, mastic resin, and salep.

Muhallebi - A custardy dish that is best served cold on a hot summer day. These are among the rare types of guilt-free puddings made with starch and rice flour, and originally without any eggs or butter.

Kunefe - Kunefe is one of the richest of all the Turkish desserts. A combination of a crispy, buttery shell packed with oozing hot cheese and topped with clotted cream and syrup and sprinkled with ground pistachios. One bite and this sweet dish will leave you craving for more.

Kunefe is made from a stretchy, unsalted fresh melting cheese called hatay found only in this region—mozzarella would be the closest Western analogue. Its appeal is the contrasting textures of the crunchy exterior against the soft, melty interior. It can be topped with pistachios, kaymak (clotted cream) or ice cream—or simply eaten on its own, preferably while still piping hot.

This sweet and savory Levantine cheese pastry is hard to avoid in Turkey; you can smell the street vendors frying it up from blocks away.
This sweet and savory Levantine cheese pastry is hard to avoid in Turkey; you can smell the street vendors frying it up from blocks away.

Kesme Dondurma

Varieties in local versions of icecreams ? Have you ever eaten ice cream with a knife and fork? Apart from the Salep Dondurma - this is another variant that you need to try. They not only grow their own salep and use exclusively natural flavors for their ice creams, but also raise goats fed only with thyme, milk vetch, and orchid flowers, to give their ice cream its sweet, subtly botanical base. While kesme dondurma uses the same type of orchid-root thickening agent used in salep dondurma, it's a specific beating method that makes it dense enough to form that solid brick shape when frozen; when eaten, it melts slowly in the mouth.

Kesmek means “to cut” in Turkish, so kesme dondurma, made from salep and goat milk, refers to an ice cream made for slicing.
Kesmek means “to cut” in Turkish, so kesme dondurma, made from salep and goat milk, refers to an ice cream made for slicing.

Revani

Revani is one of those things that the Turks and the Greeks both like to claim as their own. The dense sponge cake traditionally gets its granular texture from semolina flour. In Greece, it's made with ground almonds and sweetened with honey or orange blossom syrup. But Turkish revani uses only semolina flour and sometimes yogurt, and is served steeped in a sugar syrup.

Originally known as <em>tishpishti</em>, it was renamed revani in honor of the eponymous 16th-century Turkish poet.
Originally known as tishpishti, it was renamed revani in honor of the eponymous 16th-century Turkish poet.

We hope you have found one more reason to travel to Turkey and should you do that we are sure you would not be in dearth of options to satisfy that sweet tooth craving !!!

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