30-year-old man buys Google's Argentina domain name for just ₹200

30-year-old man buys Google's Argentina domain name for just ₹200

With over 86% of the search market share, Google is the most used search engine in the world.

The Google domain name of any country automatically becomes the most visited page due to the vast popularity and reach of the search engine.

With over 86% of the search market share, Google is the most used search engine in the world.

Google, apart from powering their own searches, also provides search results for several other engines.

In other words, the Google Domain name of any country is immensely popular, meaning it cannot be easily purchased or misused due to top-level security.

However, the same cannot be said about Argentina, where a 30-year-old web designer managed to buy the country's Google domain after the site reportedly went down for a couple of hours a few days ago.

Google's entire search engine presence in the South American country was briefly redirected to the website Nicolas Kurona, who bought the domain name for just £2 (Rs 207), according to a report by The Guardian.

30-year-old man buys Google's Argentina domain name for just ₹200
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Kuroña, a resident of Buenos Aires, says went straight into the Argentinian domain name registry, NIC Argentina after noticing Google's services were down in the country.

He was first alerted about the outage by some WhatsApp messages on his phone. So, without wasting any time, he visited the domain name registry to find out the cause.

"I entered www.google.com.ar into my browser and it didn't work. I thought something strange was happening," he told BBC.

Then when he searched for Google's URL, google.com.ar, he was shocked to see the domain name was available for just 70 pesos – £2.09.

Kurona even tweeted a screenshot of the available domain, writing: "This is what I saw the day I bought the domain from http://google.com.ar, thanks for the support"

After completing the purchase, he typed the Google URL into the search bar and saw his personal data.

"I was frozen looking at the screen. I could not believe what had just happened," he told BBC.

“I want to make it clear that I never had any bad intentions. I just tried to buy it and the NIC allowed me to,” he added.

Kurona wasn't able to hold on to the domain name as it was transferred back to Google's control shortly after the purchase.

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