Know why February 21 is celebrated as International Mother Language Day

Know why February 21 is celebrated as International Mother Language Day

The idea to celebrate this day was initiated by Bangladesh, and it so happened, after a long period of struggle.

The International Mother Language Day is observed on February 21.

It was in the year 1999, that the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) presented the topic of mother language and the issues that the people in Bangladesh faced (then Pakistan) at the UN General Conference, and since after the year 2000, this day has been observed as International Mother Language Day across the globe.

The idea to celebrate this day was initiated by Bangladesh, and it so happened, after a long period of struggle. Bangladesh, which means “the country where Bangla is spoken,” perhaps is the only country in the world known by its language.

Know why February 21 is celebrated as International Mother Language Day
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The theme for the year 2021 is, "Fostering multilingualism for inclusion in education and society".

According to the message of the Director-General of UNESCO, Audrey Azoulay, "40% of the world's inhabitants do not have access to education in the language they speak or understand best, it hinders their learning, as well as their access to heritage and cultural expressions. This year, special attention is being paid to multilingual education from early childhood, so that for children, their mother tongue is always an asset."

For every people, mother tongue is crucial to their identity. Language is not only a means through which we communicate, it is also a medium that carries our age-old heritage to us from our ancestors. It connects people, time and generations. A child learns mother tongue from her mother, family and society, and therefore it shapes a child into what kind of a person one day he or she would be. It is one of the first tools of the child for emotional and cognitive development that builds his/her personal universe, and connects him/her to the wider world, to the actions of understanding, of being understood and, most importantly, of creativity.

Linguistic diversity is increasingly under threat due to globalization factors. Increased migration brings along heavy pressure on people to communicate in a dominant language. It is a requirement for economic advancement and civic participation. Due to this, their respective native languages fade.
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The aim behind the day is to promote the preservation and protection of all languages used by the people of the world. In the era of Globalization and Digitalization, several local languages are on the verge of extinction. As per the United Nations, nearly 43 per cent of the 6,000 languages used by the people of the world are endangered. The United Nations recognized this issue and started the day to encourage people to give due regard and importance to their mother tongue.

On International Mother Language Day, we celebrate all the languages of the world. All 6,000 of them, and more. We pay our homage to all our mother tongues, equally. We value each one of them with its own traditions, creative wealth, wisdom, sounds, symbols and emotions. They are our common irreplaceable heritage. We do not want them to be extinct. We commit ourselves to spare no efforts to save them as they reflect diversity of our humanity, our plurality and our common inheritance in them.

History of International Mother Language Day

In the year 1952, Bangladesh (then Pakistan) saw a massive language movement in Dhaka as the people stood up for their rights.

Know why February 21 is celebrated as International Mother Language Day
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They started the large movement because, after the independence, the government of Pakistan declared that Urdu will be the national language. Their decision did not go down well with the people who were living in East Pakistan as their mother language was Bangla.

They raised their voice and asked for acceptance of the Bangla language as one of the official languages. The college students of Dhaka first protested in the year 1952, and it was in the year 1956 that the Pakistan government agreed to make Bangla one of the official languages.

After the long struggle, on February 29, 1956, Bengali was made the second official language of Pakistan. In the year 1971, Bangladesh became a free country, and the language Bengali also became its official language.

Let us all cherish our mother tongue. And in doing so, let us remind ourselves once again, that however diverse we may look, in essence we are all one.

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