Fake social media posts blame Egypt’s first female shipmaster Marwa for blocking Suez Canal

Fake social media posts blame Egypt’s first female shipmaster Marwa for blocking Suez Canal

Marwa negated she had been commanding the cargo ship MV EVER GIVEN causing it to lodge sideways while crossing the Suez Canal.

A huge container ship blocking the Suez Canal like a "beached whale" may take weeks to free, the salvage company said, as officials stopped all ships entering the channel on Thursday in a new setback for global trade.

However, in a new twist, a smear campaign has started on social media against Marwa Elselehdar, Egypt’s first female shipmaster, blaming her for the Suez Canal blockage.

Marwa negated she had been commanding the cargo ship MV EVER GIVEN causing it to lodge sideways while crossing the Suez Canal.

Marwa stated that she works for the Egyptian Authority of Marine Safety commanding the lighthouse tender Aida 4.

Fake social media posts blame Egypt’s first female shipmaster Marwa for blocking Suez Canal
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Egypt Today Magazine said on Twitter, “A fake post is circulating on social media alleging an Egyptian female sea captain of causing the cargo ship “Ever Given” to get stuck in Suez Canal while sailing through the international waterway.

“The photo belongs to Captain Marwa El Selehdar who works for the Egyptian Authority of Marine Safety commanding lighthouse tender Aida 4. The caption derogates Arab women’s ability to work as sea captains.”

The captain said that a screenshot of an interview she did a while ago was used and the headline was photoshopped to make the disinformation seem like recent news.

Marwa said none of the information about the canal ship being controlled by her is true.

Marwa said the published fabricated photos and information is an organised campaign against Arab women, as evidenced by the existence of 3 fake accounts bearing her name on Twitter. They have garnered 20,000 followers within a few hours since their launch.

The 400-metre (430 yard) Ever Given, almost as long as the Empire State Building is high, is blocking transit in both directions through one of the world's busiest shipping channels for oil and grain and other trade linking Asia and Europe.

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