In landmark verdict, former US cop found guilty in George Floyd murder

In landmark verdict, former US cop found guilty in George Floyd murder

Chauvin was convicted of two counts of murder and one of manslaughter in the death of Floyd

In a landmark verdict, a US grand jury found police officer Derek Chauvin guilty in the murder of 46-year-old African-American George Floyd in 2020. Floyd was killed in a brutal abuse of police force on May 25 last year, during an arrest after a store clerk alleged he had passed a counterfeit $20 bill in Minneapolis. Chauvin (45), pinned down Floyd with his knee on the pavement of a south Minneapolis intersection for more than nine minutes. "I can't breathe. I can't breathe," were his last words.

The horrific death of Floyd resulted in global protests against racism. A 12-member federal jury in Minneapolis on Tuesday found Chauvin guilty on all three counts: second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

Biden has said the conviction of Chauvin in the killing of George Floyd "can be a giant step forward" for the nation in the fight against systemic racism. He spoke from the White House hours after the verdict alongside Vice President Kamala Harris, with the pair calling for Congress to act swiftly to address policing reform. "It is not enough," Biden said of the verdict. "We can't stop here."
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Chauvin was convicted of two counts of murder and one of manslaughter in the death of Floyd, a case that sparked a national reckoning on race and policing. Biden said he hoped the verdict would give momentum to congressional police reform efforts. This is a day of justice, Harris told the family after joining Biden to watch the verdict in the private dining room off the Oval Office. Speaking hours ahead of the verdict, while the jury was deliberating in Minneapolis, Biden said he called Floyd's family on Monday to offer prayers and could "only imagine the pressure and anxiety they are feeling".

Several Indian American lawmakers and groups have welcomed the verdict. Justice was served today, but convicting Derek Chauvin won't fix the system that continues to terrorise and kill Black lives. It won't bring back George Floyd, Indian American Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal said. "Black lives matter and we must keep fighting for them by passing the Justice in Policing Act and transforming policing," Jayapal said.

Congressman Ro Khanna said: "This verdict brought accountability. I hope it will be the first of many. But it doesn't change the fact that George Floyd should still be alive today. We now must pass the Justice in Policing Act. My heart remains with the Floyd family. His life mattered. Black lives matter."

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Indian American Congressman Ami Bera tweeted: "Justice has been served."

"Grateful for justice. My heart goes out to the Floyd family," said Neera Tanden, president of Center for American Progress.

The South Asian Bar Association of North America applauded the jury verdict that found Chauvin guilty on all counts. While this verdict was a step in the right direction, it is only one step in a broader fight against the systemic racism within our country, SABA said. "Justice was served today, but justice must be served every day," said Rippi Gill, president of SABA North America. "We must not let our guard down, and we must continue to fight against the racism and violence plaguing our communities throughout the country," he said.

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