Europe’s first fully 3D-printed house gets first tenants in Netherlands

Europe’s first fully 3D-printed house gets first tenants in Netherlands

In the last two years properties partly constructed by 3D printing have been built in France and the US

A Dutch couple have become Europe’s first tenants of a fully 3D printed house in a development that its backers believe will open up a world of choice in the shape and style of the homes of the future.

Elize Lutz (70) and Harrie Dekkers (67), retired shopkeepers from Amsterdam, received their digital key – an app allowing them to open the front door of their two-bedroom bungalow at the press of a button – on Thursday.

“It is beautiful,” said Lutz. “It has the feel of a bunker – it feels safe,” added Dekkers.

Europe’s first fully 3D-printed house gets first tenants in Netherlands
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Inspired by the shape of a boulder, the dimensions of which would be difficult and expensive to construct using traditional methods, the property is the first of five homes planned by the construction firm Saint-Gobain Weber Beamix for a plot of land by the Beatrix canal in the Eindhoven suburb of Bosrijk.

In the last two years properties partly constructed by 3D printing have been built in France and the US, and nascent projects are proliferating around the world.

But those behind the Dutch house, which boasts 94sq metres of living space, are said to have pipped their rivals to the post by being the first legally habitable and commercially rented property where the load-bearing walls have been made using a 3D printer nozzle.

“This is also the first one which is 100 per cent permitted by the local authorities and which is habited by people who actually pay for living in this house,” said Bas Huysmans, chief executive of Weber Benelux, a construction offshoot of its French parent company Saint-Gobain.

The first completed home of Project Milestone, a partnership with Eindhoven University of Technology and the Vesteda housing corporation, was due to be put on the rental market in 2019, but the challenges of the architect’s design, which involved overhanging external walls, caused delays.

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