This man lived without a heart for 555 days - carried an artificial one on his back

This man lived without a heart for 555 days - carried an artificial one on his back

The device, which functions like an 'artifical heart', was strapped to his back for 555 days, according to reports.

Stan Larkin's experience of life before 25 is different from others.

His survival story is an inspiration for medical experts but it can be nerve-wracking and shocking for the common populace.

That's because Larkin managed to survive more than a year without a heart, and even managed to play light sports with his friends.

Larkin received his new heart in 2016 at the age of 25. But before that, he carried around a SyncArcadia device while waiting for a donor.

The device, which functions like an 'artifical heart', was strapped to his back for 555 days, according to reports.

The temporary heart comes into play when both sides of the heart failure and more common-heart supporting devices are not enough to keep a patient alive, according to the report by Science Daily.

Larkin opted out of staying in the hospital and decided to for a wearable 13.5 pound Freedom portable driver to keep his artificial heart beating.

"It [the SynCardia Artificial Heart] brought my life back-to make me as healthy as I am now," Larkin said at a University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center press conference in 2016.

This man lived without a heart for 555 days - carried an artificial one on his back
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Larkin wasn't the only one in his family who was suffering from heart problems. His older sibling, Dominique, had familiar cardiomyopathy, an acquired or hereditary disease of the heart muscle that makes it hard for the heart to deliver blood to the body, and can lead to heart failure.

"They were both very, very ill when we first met them in our intensive care units. We wanted to get them heart transplants, but we didn't think we had enough time. There's just something about their unique anatomic situation where other technology wasn't going to work,” said Jonathan Haft, an associate professor of cardiac surgery who performed the surgery.

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