'Only the rich could afford toilets': 2,700-year-old luxury private toilet unearthed in Israel

'Only the rich could afford toilets': 2,700-year-old luxury private toilet unearthed in Israel

A deep septic tank approximately 1.5 by 2 metres rested on a carved limestone slab with a hole in the centre (roughly 5 by 6.5 feet).

Israeli archaeologists on Tuesday revealed the discovery of a 2,700-year-old toilet, which was designed for a single home rather than a public latrine.

Archaeologists discovered a smooth, carved limestone toilet in a rectangular chamber in a huge home facing out over what is now the Old City in Jerusalem's Armon Hanatziv district, according to Israel's Antiquities Authority (IAA).

"One can only picture the amazing view," said Eli Eskosido, director of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

A deep septic tank approximately 1.5 by 2 metres rested on a carved limestone slab with a hole in the centre (roughly 5 by 6.5 feet).

According to the IAA, items recovered in the tank, such as animal bones and ceramics, might reveal information about the era's food patterns, lifestyles, and even illnesses.

"A private toilet cubicle was very rare in antiquity, and only a few were found to date," said the director of the excavation, Yaakov Billig, adding, "Only the rich could afford toilets."

He mentioned that a prominent rabbi once said that having "a toilet next to his table" was the finest indicator of a wealthy guy.

Stone columns and a garden with orchards and plants were unearthed in the house where the toilet was discovered, indicating the wealth of individuals who sat on the limestone throne.

There were also 30 to 40 bowls in the ancient lavatory, which Billig suggested might have been used for aromatics like oil, incense, or other period ways to neutralise bad odours.

Due to budgetary restrictions, the excavation has yet to be finished.

Related Stories

No stories found.