We keep naughty women at home, say Taliban as they promise 'good news soon'

We keep naughty women at home, say Taliban as they promise 'good news soon'

When asked about women who are afraid to go out of their homes under Taliban rule, the senior leader said, "We keep naughty women at home."

Afghanistan's acting interior minister and the Taliban's co-deputy leader Sirajuddin Haqqani has said the group will allow girls to go back into high school -- a promise which remains unfulfilled at the moment. He said there would be "good news soon", adding that women who protested against the regime should stay home.

After gaining control of Afghanistan, the Taliban had promised to be more liberal with their rules on women. However, the group soon reversed their decision to allow girls in school indefinitely, the CNN reported.

When asked about women who are afraid to go out of their homes under Taliban rule, the senior leader said, "We keep naughty women at home."

"By saying naughty women, it was a joke referring to those naughty women who are controlled by some other sides to bring the current government into question," he explained.

Sirajuddin Haqqani is wanted by the FBI and has been classified by the US State Department as a "specially designated global terrorist", with a$10 million bounty on his head.

"Already girls are allowed to go to school up to grade 6, and above that grade, the work is continuing on a mechanism. Very soon, you will hear very good news about this issue, God willing," he told CNN, without specifying a timeframe.

We keep naughty women at home, say Taliban as they promise 'good news soon'
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When asked whether all women have to cover their faces, he said, "We are not forcing women to wear [the] hijab, but we are advising them and preaching to them from time to time ... [the] hijab is not compulsory but it is an Islamic order that everyone should implement."

Afghan girls above Class 6 were scheduled to resume classes in March for the first time since the Taliban's takeover but were told to stay home until an appropriate school uniform according to Sharia and Afghan customs and culture was designed, an Afghan state media reported at the time.

After their return to power, the Taliban demanded that women wear at least a hijab, a scarf covering the head but revealing the face.

But since the beginning of May, they have instead forced them to wear a full veil in public and preferably a burqa, which had been compulsory when they first ran the country between 1996 and 2001.

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