Mystery of missing plane MH370 close to being solved? Expert claims to know location

Mystery of missing plane MH370 close to being solved? Expert claims to know location

The highly trained British engineer also feels the pilot was being followed

The hopes of finding the reason behind the missing flight MH370 have increased because of an aerospace expert. The expert has brought into use radio wave technology to track the course of the missing plane and find its last position in the water. The expert named Richard Godfrey believes the Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777, which vanished on March 8, 2014, en route to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur with 239 passengers and crew on board, is in the ocean 1933 kilometres west of Perth.

The highly trained British engineer also feels the pilot was being followed, as demonstrated by several peculiar patterns in the plane's flight path, as reported by Mirror. The new discovery has given a new turn to the story, and the families of several of the missing passengers now say that the plane was intentionally shot down and that their loved ones were murdered.

It is to be noted that there has been no development in the case of the Malaysia Airlines plane for a while. Until now, no remains of the plane have been found even after investing around $200 million in the search.

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Richard employed the Weak Signal Propagation Reporter, a highly sophisticated analytical tool, to estimate the course of the ill-fated aeroplane and the likely location of its remnants in an area known as the seventh arc by tracing 160 different disturbances detected in its radio frequencies.

The aircraft, which was piloted by Zaharie Ahmad Shah, made some 360-degree turns, indicating that the pilot was fully engaged and altering course deliberately rather than automatically, as previously stated. He noticed that after three hours in the air, the plane was put into a holding pattern for around 20 minutes, which is common when air controllers are waiting for approval.

Richard believes the pilot stalled above the southern Indian Ocean to call Malaysian authorities, despite the fact that they claim they had no contact for 38 minutes following take-off, as reported by Sky News. The developments have led people to believe in new theories surrounding the plane's disappearance.

However, other specialists in the field are reviewing Richard Godfrey's findings in the hopes of persuading Malaysian authorities to launch a new search for the wreckage.

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