Russian journalist to sell Nobel Peace Prize medal to support Ukrainian children

Russian journalist to sell Nobel Peace Prize medal to support Ukrainian children

Muratov was extremely critical of the Russian government after the annexation of Crimea in 2014

Russian journalist Dmitry Muratov has decided to auction off his Noble Peace Prize medal in order to help children who were affected by the ongoing crisis in Ukraine. The journalist, who received the prestigious award in 2021, said that all the proceeds from the auction will go to UNICEF and their efforts in helping the children who were displaced due to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Muratov founded Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta and was heavily involved in it before it was shut down due to his criticism of the government. Muratov has already donated the $500,000 cash award that came with the Nobel Prize to charity and his aim “is to give the children refugees a chance for a future.”

“We want to return their future,” he said in an interview with Associated Press.

“It has to become a beginning of a flash mob as an example to follow so people auction their valuable possessions to help Ukrainians,” Muratov said in a video released by Heritage Auctions.

Muratov was extremely critical of the Russian government after the annexation of Crimea in 2014 and last year, he shared the Nobel Peace Prize with journalist Maria Ressa of the Philippines.

“It’s a very bespoke deal,” said Joshua Benesh, the chief strategy officer for Heritage Auctions. “Not everyone in the world has a Nobel Prize to auction and not every day of the week that there’s a Nobel Prize crossing the auction block.”

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Benesh also said that the ongoing crisis and the noble mission of the auction will generate more interest among the potential buyers and that can increase the value of the medal.

“I think there’s certainly going to be some excitement Monday,” Benesh said according to AP. “It’s such a unique item being sold under unique circumstances ... a significant act of generosity, and such a significant humanitarian crisis.”

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