Mahsa Amini protests: Tehran fountains sinking in blood

Mahsa Amini protests: Tehran fountains sinking in blood

Activists described the red water fountains as "works of art" titled "Tehran covered in blood."

The public squares fountains in Iran’s capital, Tehran, have reportedly been smeared red on Friday after an artist dyed their water red to reflect the bloody three-week crackdown on protests over the death of Mahsa Amini who was arrested by the Iranian morality police.

The fountains in Tehran’s Student Park, Fatemi Square and Artists’ Park were flowing with red water.

The images and video of the blood red fountains were shared online by the 1500tasvir on Twitter that monitors violations in Iran.

On Twitter, activists described the red water fountains as “artworks” entitled “Tehran covered in blood”, noting that they were made by an unknown artist.

BBC Persian service later said the water had drained away, although traces of red can still be seen on the fountains, in photos posted to Instagram.

Iran has been witnessing a wave of unrest since the announcement of the death of the 22-year-old Kurdish-Iranian woman on September 16, following her arrest in Tehran against the background of her failure to adhere to the Islamic dress code.

Mahsa Amini death led to an escalation of popular anger and sparked protests, the largest in Iran in nearly three years, and a crackdown during which dozens of protesters were killed and hundreds arrested.

On Friday, October 7, an Iranian coroner’s report found that Mahsa Amini died of multiple organ failure due to cerebral hypoxia – a condition in which a reduced supply of oxygen to the brain occurs despite adequate blood flow.

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The protesters, who are out in demonstrations led by the majority of women, demand answers and an investigation into the cause and manner of Amini’s death, the abolition of the strict veil laws and the dissolution of the morality police that enforce these laws.

According to the Oslo-based Human Rights Organization in Iran, at least 92 people were killed in Iran in the crackdown on demonstrations taking place for more than three weeks, which included the imposition of strict restrictions on the Internet, including the ban on the platforms Instagram and WhatsApp.

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