Climate activists glue themselves to dinosaur exhibit in Berlin museum

Climate activists glue themselves to dinosaur exhibit in Berlin museum

The other campaigner, Solvig Schinkoethe, expressed concern about the effects of climate change as a mother of four children.

To protest the German government's climate policy, two environmental activists remained riveted to a display of a dinosaur bone at Berlin's Natural History Museum on Sunday.

It was the most recent museum action by climate activists after famous artworks were attacked in various ways throughout Europe.

Two ladies brandishing a banner that read, "What if the government doesn't have it under control?" fastened themselves to metal poles supporting a 60 million years old dinosaur skeleton in Berlin.

Caris Connell, one of the women, declared that she feared "forest fires, water shortages, famines, and war."

"Dinosaurs died out, because they could not withstand massive changes to the climate. That is also threatening us," added the 34-year-old.

The other campaigner, Solvig Schinkoethe, expressed concern about the effects of climate change as a mother of four children.

"Peaceful resistance is the way we have chosen to protect our children from the deadly ignorance of governments," said the 42-year-old.

They urged the Berlin government to act quickly to reduce emissions, such as by imposing a speed restriction on highways and adopting more reasonably priced public transportation.

According to the museum, authorities ended the issue in under an hour. It stated in a statement that there was property damage and that criminal charges had been brought.

Climate activists glue themselves to dinosaur exhibit in Berlin museum
A pair of 'climate activists' throw mashed potatoes at Monet's Les Meules painting

The protesters belonged to the Last Generation group, which earlier this month daubed mashed potatoes on Claude Monet's $111 million "Les Meules" (Haystacks) at the Museum Barberini in Potsdam, Germany.

A Dutch museum's "Girl with a Pearl Earring" by Johannes Vermeer was the target of soup-throwing climate campaigners in recent weeks, as was the National Gallery in London's "Sunflowers" by Vincent van Gogh.

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