School bans pupils from all forms of physical contact - even hugs and handshakes - to prevent relationships

School bans pupils from all forms of physical contact - even hugs and handshakes - to prevent relationships

According to reports, the letter outlined that the school will not tolerate any ‘aggressive physical contact’ like 'hugging' or 'holding hands'.

A high school in the UK has drawn heavy criticism after banning all forms of physical contact between students in a bid to prevent them from having relationships.

Students of Hylands School in Chelmsford will not be allowed to hug, hold hands or even shake hands with one another. The 'draconian' ruling was enforced after the administration sent a letter informing parents they would be cracking down on all forms of physical contacts between students, according to a Daily Mail report.

According to reports, the letter outlined that the school will not tolerate any ‘aggressive physical contact’ like 'hugging' or 'holding hands'.

School bans pupils from all forms of physical contact - even hugs and handshakes - to prevent relationships
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The letter stated: “This is in order to keep your child safe. If your child is touching somebody else, whether they are consenting or not, anything could happen. It could lead to an injury, make someone feel very uncomfortable, or someone being touched inappropriately.”

The new rules also restrict the use of mobile phones in campus. If a student is caught using a phone, the device would be locked in a safe for a day.

Unsurprisingly, parents soon began slamming the new rules and questioned the school's policies.

One parent told Essex Live that no one was informed about the new rules untul the letter was sent out.

"I couldn't believe it. In this day and age, I agree that inappropriate touching - hitting and punching - of course has to be dealt with. But they're not teaching students how to have a healthy relationship," the parent said.

"The inference is that you can't touch anyone, children won't know what is or isn't appropriate, and the ability to empathise with their peers is being taken away," the parent added.

Maggie Callaghan, executive headteacher for Hylands School, told BBC that the new policies are desighed to 'support culture of mutual respect and inclusion'.

"All our policies are designed to support our culture of mutual respect and inclusion, and our most recent policy has received positive feedback from parents and pupils alike," she told the news outlet.

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